Wednesday, May 11, 2016

People with high IQs really DO see the world differently: Researchers find they process sensory information differently


What we are really describing here is contemplative meditation which i suspect can be learned and nurtured.  Once that talent becomes ingrained, processing masses of material is easy enough and all that builds on the apparent general intelligence.

Central to genius is not concentration in the moment so much as having isolated millions of those factoids and setting them aside to 'forget'.   If they ever prove useful you can anticipate your subconscious to dredge them up for you.  You still have to have absorbed the intellectual input in order to have a recognizable language to work with when it does.

All this is often in the moment and your key is always to study the question asked.  This also can be set aside pending new information.

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People with high IQs really DO see the world differently: Researchers find they process sensory information differently 

Experts found that a high IQ brain was better able to block out larger or more irrelevant images when focussing on a small moving object 

But surprisingly, when tested with larger objects, people with a high IQ were slower to see what was right in front of them 

Scientists say this explains why some brains are more efficient than others
 
Published: 11:31 GMT, 27 May 2013 


People with high IQ scores aren't just more intelligent - they also process sensory information differently, according to new study.

Scientists discovered that the brains of people with high IQ are automatically more selective when it comes to perceiving moving objects, meaning that they are more likely to suppress larger and less relevant background motion.

‘It is not that people with high IQ are simply better at visual perception,’ said Duje Tadin of the University of Rochester. ‘Instead, their visual perception is more discriminating.'

Scientists discovered that the brains of people with high IQ are more selective when perceiving objects in motion, meaning that they are more likely to ignore larger and less relevant background motion

'They excel at seeing small, moving objects but struggle in perceiving large, background-like motions.’

The discovery was made by asking people to watch videos showing moving bars on a computer screen.

Their task was to state whether the bars were moving to the left or to the right. 

That ability to block out distraction helps to explain what makes some brains more efficient than others

The researchers measured how long the video had to run before the individual could correctly perceive the motion.

The results show that individuals with high IQ can pick up on the movement of small objects faster than low-IQ individuals can.

'That wasn't unexpected, Tadin says.

The surprise came when tests with larger objects showed just the opposite: individuals with high IQ were slower to see what was right there in front of them.

‘There is something about the brains of high-IQ individuals that prevents them from quickly seeing large, background-like motions,’ Tadin added.

In other words, it isn't a conscious strategy but rather something automatic and fundamentally different about the way these people's brains work.

The ability to block out distraction is very useful in a world filled with more information than we can possibly take in. 

It helps to explain what makes some brains more efficient than others. An efficient brain 'has to be picky' Tadin said.

The findings were reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

I guess this explains those people that can see a single ant crawling from across the room.

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