Tuesday, August 2, 2016

Not Just Bees, All Insects are in Decline and Heading for Extinction



 
In a way this was expected.  Bees are simply the most exposed to insecticides in the need to visit hundreds of flowers every day.

Yet the build up in the environment has to impact all other insects.  Lately we see populations collapse of monarch butterflys  for much the same reason as bees as they too visit many flower heads.

 Actually the study reported here is insane.  We have an 83% decline in the bio mass of all insects in the study area. over thirty years. this is awful.

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Not Just Bees, All Insects are in Decline and Heading for Extinction

By WakingTimes July 23, 2016

Alex Pietrowski,

http://www.wakingtimes.com/2016/07/23/not-just-bees-insects-decline-heading-extinction/


Researchers are feverishly working to understand the global die off of the world’s bee species, and have linked colony collapse disorder to the use of neonicotinoid pesticides along with other common agrichemicals. As it turns out, the impact of modern industrial agriculture and widespread chemical contamination of our environment is not just affecting bees, but also contributing to the loss of all insects, and some scientists believe we are moving in the direction of mass extinction.

Several studies by entomologists in recent years support this notion and raise the flag for greater concern. German researchers with the Krefeld Entomological Association have since 1989 been conducting an annual experiment measuring the volume of summer insects in the western German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. Trapping migratory and mating insects in the wild has proven there is indeed a significant reduction in populations of many species of invertebrates.

“The average biomass of insects caught between May and October has steadily decreased from 1.6 kilograms (3.5 pounds) per trap in 1989 to just 300 grams (10.6 ounces) in 2014.” [Source]

“These data on species composition changes and the general trends of modifications may reflect effects from climate change and atmospheric nitrogen loads, as indicated by the ecological characteristics of host plant species and local changes in habitat configuration with increasing fragmentation.” [Source]

Furthermore, another study conducted in 2014 documented a worldwide decline in insect and invertebrate populations, reinforcing concern that this issue is not limited to any specific geographical region.

“By combining data from the few comprehensive studies that exist, lead author Rodolfo Dirzo, an ecologist at Stanford University, developed a global index for invertebrate abundance that showed a 45 percent decline over the last four decades. Dirzo points out that out of 3,623 terrestrial invertebrate species on the International Union for Conservation of Nature [IUCN] Red List, 42 percent are classified as threatened with extinction.” [Source]

Seeking to identify the cause for such rapid declines in insect populations, a survey conducted in 2012 by the Zoological Society of London shows a staggering 45% decline in invertebrate abundance in the last four decades.

“Rodolfo Dirzo, an ecologist at Stanford University, developed a global index for invertebrate abundance that showed a 45 percent decline over the last four decades. Dirzo points out that out of 3,623 terrestrial invertebrate species on the International Union for Conservation of Nature [IUCN] Red List, 42 percent are classified as threatened with extinction.” [Source]

The importance of the role of insects in the global ecosystem can not be understated, as ecological collapse starts form the bottom up. Geoff Boxshall, Secretary of Zoological Society of London sums it up well here:

“Invertebrates are one of the essential foundations of healthy ecosystems that we depend on: almost every marine fish that forms part of the human food chain will have fed on invertebrates at some time during its development, for example. We directly consume invertebrates, such as shellfish, or their products, such as honey, but our awareness of the importance of invertebrates has generally been low, even though we rely on invertebrates to pollinate our crops, to reprocess our waste, and to deliver a multitude of other services. This situation is now changing and research has also highlighted the importance of invertebrates as regulators of ecosystem processes.” [Source]

Final Thoughts

Sadly, the burden of changing this falls squarely on the shoulders of global industry leaders, however, as individuals we can help to affect change by altering our buying habits, choosing to support organic food producers, and by creating healthy habitats for bees and other insects in our neighborhoods and communities.

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