Thursday, June 5, 2014

Extensive Cell Phone Use Linked to Triple Brain Cancer Risk





I have not addressed this for a long time and it is good to see that the science is conforming to what I did observe among acquaintances.  The good news is that the effect is actually getting less, but that care does need to be exercised.


If you need to use it a lot, get ear plugs and all that.  The brain is the most vulnerable, while the rest of the body pretty well does okay.  After all it is typically necessary to move the phone when it activates.


Otherwise I expect the problem as it stands to abate.  It never became a visible epidemic, but do not tell that to the survivors of course.  The reality remains that folks did die and this work confirms a statistical linkage already well suspected.  Again the industry stonewalled and may or may not have put in available fixes.


Extensive cell phone use can triple brain cancer risk




Saturday, May 17, 2014 by: L.J. Devon, Staff Writer
(NaturalNews) Questions continue to arise about cell phones and their contribution to certain cancers. Even the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has raised some concern about extensive cell phone use. The NCI explains that cell phones emit radio frequency energy in the form of non-ionizing radiation. In other words, a cell phone basically lets off radio waves which are absorbed by the nearest tissues of the body. If a person carries a phone in their pocket all day long, energy can be absorbed into the person's side and midsection.


How does this energy affect the cells over time?


Does this constant exposure disrupt cellular processes, especially when held up to the brain?


While the NCI says that a cell phone's non-ionizing radiation has not been proven for carcinogenic activity, other studies may prove otherwise.

More than 15 hours of cell phone use per month may triple brain cancer risk

French scientists are now reporting on a new cohort study showing how extensive cell phone use can increase one's risk of brain cancer. The study, included in the newest issue of the British journal Occupational and Environmental Medicine, found that brain cancer risks tripled in individuals who use their phones for more than 15 hours per month.


This study coincides with a report in 2011 from the International Agency for Research on Cancer showing how mobile phones let off radio frequency fields that are capable of possessing carcinogenic activity in some people.


In this new French study, glioma and meningioma brain tumors occurred three times more often than normal in patients who used their 
cell phones extensively in their careers and day-to-day activities.


"Our study is part of that trend, but the results have to be confirmed," said Isabelle Baldi, of the University of Bordeaux in southwestern France, who took part in the study.


Naysayers of the study believe that the results cannot be confirmed and do not include an accurate picture of phone use in real life, including factors such as smoking. Furthermore, a relationship between 
cell phone use and cancer is never established in the cohort study. Also, as phone technology evolves, different levels of radioactivity are emitted by different phones, making cancer connections nearly impossible to make.


The study even acknowledged this: "The rapid evolution of technology has led to a considerable increase in the use of mobile phones and a parallel decrease of [radiowave intensity] emitted by the phones."


"It is difficult to define a level of risk, if any, especially as mobile phone technology is constantly evolving."


Tumor rates three times higher for those with careers that demand extensive cell phone use
In the cohort study, several different groups of people were followed over time as cell phone use was averaged among the groups. In the study, 253 cases of glioma and 194 cases of meningioma were investigated in between 2004 and 2006. Patients' lifestyles were compared with 892 healthy (control) individuals from the general population. The researchers examined cell phone use of all individuals in a two- to ten-year period, with an average observation period of five years. After analyzing cancer incidence data, the researchers found striking results.


On average, glioma and meningioma patients used their cell phones more extensively for career and lifestyle purposes. Those in sales used their phone the most, which likely contributed to the higher prevalence of brain cancer.



Risk highest for cell phone use before age 20
The findings correlate with a Swedish cohort study between 1997 and 2003 that showed increased risk for glioma with cumulative cell phone use. Questionnaires investigating cell phone use from 1,251 brain cancer patients and 2,438 healthy controls showed an increased risk for glioma for patients who first used cell phones before the age of 20. Possibly, highest risk of brain cancer from cell phone use is based on both extended use (over 15 hours a week) and from use beginning at an early age.


Sources for this article include:

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